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Your Guide to Super Short-Form and Snackable Video

In the world of ad skipping and dwindling attention spans, it's time we talk about the super-short form video. The fight for attention spans and meaningful storytelling is here. Ever since the 6-second YouTube bumper ad came on the scene in 2016, it's clear there's a place for short-form video! Audiences are consuming more and more of this kind of content, and as video length increases, so does viewer drop-off. Don't worry though, for brand recall and recognition, you can't beat short form!


“Video advertising all comes down to your audience — and younger audiences want shorter, snackable content to engage with multiple times per day, across multiple channels.” -
Andy Halko, CEO of Insivia.

So, what kind of short-form videos are there?

You have snackable video (30 seconds or less) and then you have super short-form videos (10 or less). Jaclyn Rose puts it well: "It’s the hook, the foot-in-the-door, the branding and awareness play that will turn video viewers into interested buyers."

As companies realize attention is waning, they're looking for innovative ways to interact with their target audience. Super short-form video is a great solution because it intrigues your audience, amplifies and reinforces your message!


T
hink of short-form as a supplement to your existing (longer) brand content

Let's say you already have long form content at your disposal. Take our Video Strategist Jordan's advice: "It depends on the goal - most of the time, I'd say short-form video is additive. It's usually made to drive to longer form content or to reinforce a message, preventing creative fatigue so you aren't being shown the same ad over and over. However, if your message is short and sweet like 'Merry Christmas', a snackable video can stand alone." 

 

This video lead to a longer video about Kiwis. 


Shorter means visuals are even more important!

To make your message as impactful as it can be in half a minute, visuals are more important than ever. Remember, sound is not always a given on social, so try and focus on the impactful and memorable images. StoryMe's Creative Director Tanguy De Muynck says, "The best way to interact on social is to present your offer in bite-size pieces, highlighting one aspect at a time. We’re all competing for several seconds of attention, so use short and visually appealing teasers to trigger your audience into exploring your brand."
 

 

Short and sweet wins on social

People are whipping through their newsfeeds faster than you can say snack. That's why it's important to make longer content work for social, too. Something you can do is create a series of short form video to tie into a bigger message while also creating more engagement touch points along the way. By using an existing video you already have, you can always segment and repurpose for channels Instagram, Snapchat, LinkedIn, etc.

 


A way around this is to use a teaser of a shorter video to drive traffic to the full-length video on platforms like YouTube or your website. Something else to keep in mind when setting out to create a snackable
 video is optimizing for sound off with captions and strong visuals. Keep the platform in mind!

Tip for YouTube: the best mix is to create a combination of bumper ads with TrueView in-stream ads. Use the bumper ads to amplify, reinforce or echo a message.

💡 Remember, your brand or service can benefit from super short-form video:

  • It's extremely shareable
  • It improves brand recall
  • It's fit for modern attention spans
  • Just because a video is short doesn't mean you should skimp on quality! Studies show that people will lose their patience with poorly produced content and will be less likely to share.
  • Creativity, cross-channel strategy, and purpose are always important 

 

Want to explore how your brand can utilize super-short form video?  

Let's talk snackable video!

 

 

Tags: Strategy, Marketing